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About low-carbon energy sources in Europe

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Every country has unique electricity needs and it's own electricity mix, depending on its environment, policies, import and export balance and demand. In this presentation we are taking a look at energy sources in the EU. We will explore where our energy comes from and take a closer look at low-carbon energy sources through statistical data from EU and its member states.

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In this presentation we’ll take a look at energy sources in the EU. We will explore where our energy comes from and take a closer look at low-carbon energy sources through statistical data from EU and its member states. The information in this presentation is taken from a publication of Eurostat (ali Eurostat’s publication), called Shedding light on energy in the EU. We developed the content of this presentation with the expert support by Mojca Suvorov from the Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia, a partner of Eurostat in the European Statistical System. 2. CENTRAL PART – CONTENT Lighting, heating, moving, producing... (se doda infomacija da gre za citat s spletne strani) ...energy is vital for our day-to-day life. Without energy, people and businesses cannot function. Turning on our computers or starting our cars are actions that we take for granted, yet they represent the final stage of a complex process. First of all, energy resources have to be extracted from our environment. Primary energy sources are transformed into energy products available for consumption. For example crude oil is transformed into motor gasoline, while fossil, nuclear and renewable energy are transformed into electricity. Statistics can help to make the complex process of energy use more understandable. It can help us answer basic questions such as: • Where does our energy come from? • How dependent are we on energy imports? • Which kind of energy do we consume in the EU and how much does it cost? • Are we efficient in the consumption of energy? • How much greenhouse gas do we emit in the EU? The Eurostat has launched a virtual guided tour of Energy Statistics, 2020 edition: https://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/cache/infographs/energy/ In this tour, you can find information about the European Green Deal and the Energy Union, types of energy available in Europe, types of energy we consume and the links between energy and the environment. We will focus on the question “what energy is available in the EU?”. /Izjava strokovnjaka, vprašanje: Kako nam poznavanje statističnih podatkov koristi za sprejemanje boljših odločitev?/ To get the answer to this question, you need data. Reliable, comparable, high quality data. It is important for users to know where to find data and how to use them. Slovene statistical office produce high quality data to support the decisions on various levels - our users are researchers, decision-makers, journalists, students and general public. Statistical data are disseminated via different channels: starting from the web site with over 600 press releases annually to the freely available data base, with over billion data points, but also on a facebook and twitter acconuts of the office. The partnership of national statistical offices and Eurostat in the European statistical system is a guarantee that data are reliable, comparable and appropriate for decision making on a national and EU level. Slovenia and other EU member states provide national statistics to Eurostat for the production of European statistic – which is used also in the publication Shedding light on energy in EU. Where does our energy come from? The energy available in the European Union comes from energy produced in the EU and from energy imported from third countries. To get a good overview of the total energy available in the EU, energy production should always be put in context with imports. In 2018, the EU produced around 42 % of its own energy, while 55 % was imported. The energy mix in the EU was mainly made up by five different sources in 2018: Petroleum products (including crude oil) (36 %), natural gas (21 %), solid fossil fuels (15 %), renewable energy (15 %) and nuclear energy (13 %). The shares of the different energy sources in the total energy available vary considerably between Member States. Petroleum products, natural gas and fossil fuels account for a significant share in countries such as Cyprus, Italy, the Netherlands, Estonia and Poland. Low-carbon sources are stronger in other countries. Nuclear energy, a low-carbon energy source, accounts for 42 % in France and 32 % Sweden, while renewables have the highest share of 39 % in both Latvia and Sweden. Let's take a look at the share of low-carbon energy sources in EU member states. /prikazan bo screen recording grafa/ As we click on renewable energy sources, we can see a graph representing the shares of renewables in EU member states. European average is marked with the EU flag, the countries on the left are below average and those on the right have a share of renewables higher than the EU average. Among NEWCOMERS consortium member states, Sweden, Italy and Slovenia have the largest shares and are above the European average. And now a quick look at nuclear energy, another low-carbon energy source. Here we can see the EU average, on the left countries with lower than average share or without nuclear energy, and on the right we can see those with higher shares. Among NEWCOMERS countries, Sweden and Slovenia have the largest shares of nuclear energy. If you're interested to learn more about energy sources in the EU, follow the link on the slide.

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This multimedia content is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike (CC BY-SA) 4.0 License. However, the license of the specific external resource(s) referred to in this presentation might differ from CC BY-SA 4.0 license and therefore needs to be checked before remix, adaptation, or other kinds of reuse.

Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike (CC BY-SA) 4.0 License

This multimedia content is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike (CC BY-SA) 4.0 License. However, the license of the specific external resource(s) referred to in this presentation might differ from CC BY-SA 4.0 license and therefore needs to be checked before remix, adaptation, or other kinds of reuse. More info »

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  • Low carbon energy sources
  • Environment and climate
  • Educate me
  • Energy communities
  • Interested citizens
  • Statistics
  • Video
  • Infographic
  • Statistics

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